Leaf Management

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Each year, lawn and landscape waste is placed into the curbside collection system which uses valuable landfill space, removes nutrients from the environment, and cost cities and their taxpayers more in increased taxes and service costs. 

During the fall and early winter, when lawns stop growing and the leaf rake replaces the lawnmower, tree leaves become a major component of lawn wastes.

Here are several ideas for keeping these wonderfully beneficial by-products of our beautiful Irving landscapes out of the curbside collection system.

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Mowing: A light covering of leaves can be mowed, simply leaving shredded leaves in place on the lawn. This technique is most effective when a mulching mower is used. In fact, during times of light leaf drop, this technique is probably the most efficient and easiest way to manage leaf accumulation. 

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Mulching: Mulching is a simple and effective way to recycle leaves and improve your landscape. Mulching reduces evaporation from soil surface, inhibits weed growth, moderates soil temperatures, keeps soil from eroding and crusting and prevents soil compaction. Leaves can be used as mulch in vegetable gardens, flower beds and around shrubs and trees. Leaves that have been mowed or run through some other type shredder will decompose faster and will be more likely to remain in place than unshredded leaves.

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Composting: Knowledge of composting dates back to the early Greeks and Romans. In America, the value of composting was recognized by George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and George Washington Carver. Today knowledge and interest in the science of composting is increasing dramatically. Whether an ancient art or a modern science, composting is a useful and environmentally sound gardening practice.